2020 Olympic Games Mascots

The 2020 Olympic Games mascots have been unveiled.
Find out about Miraitowa and Someity here...

 By Martin Hughes
 Owner and Editor

The organisers of the Tokyo 2020 Olympic Games and Paralympic Games have unveiled the official Olympic and Paralympic Mascots - Miraitowa and Someity.

Tokyo 2020 Olympic Games Mascots

The Tokyo 2020 mascots were chosen by elementary school children within Japan as well as from Japanese schools abroad, and they're the first mascots in Olympic and Paralympic Games history to be chosen exclusively by elementary school children.

16,769 schools and 205,755 classes voted and Miraitowa and Someity were unveiled as the official mascots.

The role of the mascots will be to communicate the Olympic and Paralympic spirit and contribute to the excitement of the Games during the Opening and Closing Ceremonies, as well as at Games venues and around town.


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Miraitowa - the Tokyo 2020 Olympic Games Mascot

Tokyo 2020 Olympic Games Mascot Miraitowa playing table tennis

The name Miraitowa is based on the Japanese words "Mirai"(future) and "towa" (eternity) connected together, and was chosen to promote a future full of hope forever, in the hearts of all the people in the world.

The Tokyo 2020 Olympic Games mascot has the same indigo blue ichimatsu-patterns as the Tokyo 2020 Games Emblem on its head and body.

The mascot's personality is derived from a traditional Japanese proverb that means to learn old things well and to acquire new knowledge from them.

The mascot has both an old-fashioned aspect that respects tradition and an innovative aspect that is in tune with cutting-edge information.

It has a strong sense of justice, and is very athletic.

The mascot's special ability is to be able to move anywhere instantly.


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Someity - the Tokyo 2020 Paralympic Games Mascot

Tokyo 2020 Paralympic Games Mascot Someity playing table tennis

The name Someity comes from "Someiyoshino", a popular cherry blossom variety, and the phrase "so mighty".

Someity has cherry blossom tactile sensors, and can show enormous mental and physical strength.

The mascot represents Paralympic athletes who overcome obstacles and redefine the boundaries of possibility.

 

The Tokyo 2020 Paralympic Games mascot is a cool character with cherry blossom tactile sensors and super powers.

It can send and receive telepathy using the cherry blossom antennae on both sides of its face.

It can also fly using its ichimatsu-pattern cloak.

It is usually quiet, but it can demonstrate great power when necessary.

It embodies Paralympic athletes that demonstrate superhuman power.

It has a dignified inner strength and it also loves nature.

It can talk to stones and wind by using its super power, and also is able to move things by just looking at them.


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Tokyo 2020 Olympic Games Mascots

Olympic Rings


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TABLE TENNIS AT THE OLYMPIC GAMES
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