Table Tennis World Ranking

The table tennis world ranking list is a computerised rating system.
So who are the best players? Find out here...

 By Martin Hughes
 Owner and Editor

Table Tennis World Rankings by ITTF

The International Table Tennis Federation (ITTF) produces a world ranking list by entering the results of matches played in authorised events into a computerised database.

Using these results, the ITTF is able to produce a current list of the best table tennis players in the world.

Separate ranking lists are produced each month for the senior men and senior women together with separate ranking lists only for players under 21 years of age; junior players (under 17 years) and cadet players (under 14 years).

These ranking lists are used for determining seeding in all tournaments and for selecting players for certain competitions.

2018 - A New System

With effect from 1 January 2018 the ITTF introduced a new system for calculating world rankings.

It's much simpler than the previous system and it's designed to encourage players to play in more World Ranking events.

Players now receive World Ranking Points based only on the final position they reach at tournaments. So, the better they perform, the more points they'll receive.

The number of World Ranking Points a player receives are set out in the tables below, with the most prestigious events offering the most points.

So, for the two most prestigious events in the table tennis calendar - the Olympic Games and the World Championships - the winner receives 3,000 points, whilst for the World Cup and the World Tour Grand Finals the winner receives 2,550 points.

Other events award fewer World Ranking Points (see tables below) and are on a sliding scale.


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8 of the Best

Although players can enter many events throughout the year, only their best 8 results during the last 12 months are used (with a maximum of one continental event) to calculate their World Ranking.

The previous system also included losing points when they lost a match, but this no longer applies.

And separate ranking lists are now calculated for each age category (Senior, U21, Junior, Cadet) by only using results achieved in the respective age category. In the previous system, only one list was compiled and rankings for the age categories were just a sub set of the main list.


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World Ranking Points Tables for Senior Events

In 2019 the number of points awarded in some events were slightly altered. Here are the current lists...

OLYMPIC GAMES
Position World Ranking Points
Winner 3000
Runner-Up 2550
3rd position 1950
4th position 1800
Quarter-finalist 1500
Loser in Round of 16 1200
Loser in Round of 32 900
Loser in 2nd round 600
Loser in 1st round 450
Loser in Prelim. round 300
Matches won at team event 250

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WORLD CHAMPIONSHIPS
Position World Ranking Points
Winner 3000
Runner-Up 2550
Semi-finalist 1950
Quarter-finalist 1500
Loser in Round of 16 1200
Loser in Round of 32 900
Loser in Round of 64 600
Loser in Round of 128 450
Loser in Preliminary Round 300
2nd place in group 225
3rd place in group 150
4th place in group 75
5th place in group 30
TEAM MATCHES  
Championship division - main draw and qualification 250
Championship division - position matches 180
2nd division - main draw and qualification 100
2nd division - position matches 72
3rd division - main draw and qualification 50
3rd division - position matches 36

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WORLD CUP
Position World Ranking Points
Winner 2550
Runner-Up 1915
3rd position 1660
4th position 1530
Quarter-finalist 1275
Loser in Round of 16 1020
Position 17-20 765
WORLD TEAM CUP  
Matches won at World Team Cup 250

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WORLD TOUR GRAND FINALS
Position World Ranking Points
Winner 2550
Runner-Up 2040
Semi-finalist 1660
Quarter-finalist 1275
Loser in Round of 16 1020

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WORLD TOUR PLATINUM
Position World Ranking Points
Winner 2250
Runner-Up 1800
Semi-finalist 1465
Quarter-finalist 1125
Loser in Round of 16 900
Loser in Round of 32 675
Loser in Qualification Round of 32 450
Loser in Qualification Round of 64 340
Loser in Qualification Round of 128 225
Loser in Qualification Round of 256 170
Loser in Qualification Round of 512 / Participation 115

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WORLD TOUR
Position World Ranking Points
Winner 1800
Runner-Up 1440
Semi-finalist 1170
Quarter-finalist 900
Loser in Round of 16 720
Loser in Round of 32 540
Loser in Qualification Round of 32 360
Loser in Qualification Round of 64 270
Loser in Qualification Round of 128 180
Loser in Qualification Round of 256 135
Loser in Qualification Round of 512 / Participation 90

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CONTINENTAL CHAMPIONSHIPS and CUPS
Position World Ranking Points
Winner 1800
Runner-Up 1350
3rd position 1170
4th position 1080
5th position 900
6th position 855
7th position 810
8th position 765
Loser in Round of 16 720
Loser in Round of 32 540
Loser in Round of 64 360
Loser in Round of 128 270
Loser in Qualification Round of 32 270
Loser in Qualification Round of 64 180
Loser in Qualification Round of 128 135
Loser in Qualification Round of 256 90
Matches won in groups (max 10) 25
Participation 12

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ITTF CHALLENGE PLUS SERIES
Position World Ranking Points
Winner 1100
Runner-Up 880
Semi-finalist 715
Quarter-finalist 550
Loser in Round of 16 440
Loser in Round of 32 330
Loser in Round of 64 220

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MULTI-SPORT GAMES
e.g. Commonwealth Games, Pan-Am Games
Position World Ranking Points
Winner 600
Runner-Up 450
3rd position 390
4th position 360
5th position 300
6th position 285
7th position 270
8th position 255
Loser in Round of 16 240
Loser in Round of 32 180
Loser in Round of 64 120
Loser in Round of 128 90
Loser in Qualification Round of 32 90
Loser in Qualification Round of 64 60
Loser in Qualification Round of 128 45
Loser in Qualification Round of 256 30
Matches won in groups (max 5) 10
Participation 5

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Valid for 12 months

World Ranking Points are valid for 12 months, but Ranking Points awarded at the Olympic Games and World Championships are valid for longer.

Because these two events are not held annually, Ranking Points awarded at the Olympic Games are valid for 48 months but reduce by 25% each year. So the first year they're worth 100%; the second year 75%; the third year 50%, and the fourth year 25%.

And the Ranking Points awarded at the World Championships (individual and team) are valid for 24 months, but after the first year the points are reduced by 50%.

The ITTF publishes the World Ranking List at the beginning of every month, usually by the 6th day of the month.

Players who do not have any recorded international results for more than 24 months are excluded from the published ranking lists.

However, special rules apply to players who are unable to play due to injury, sickness or pregnancy.


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Doubles Events and Age Categories

For doubles events; Under 21 years; juniors (under 17 years) and cadets (under 14 years); the same system applies, but they use a different set of points tables (not shown here).


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The pre 2018 system - The basic principles

The system in use pre-2018 was as follows...

Players received or lost rating points for each match played in an authorised ITTF event.

The winner gained a certain number of points whilst, at the same time, points were deducted from the rating of the loser.

The number of points won or lost depended on the relative strength of the two players involved.

Points were added or deducted in accordance with a rating points table.

"Expected results" were those matches where the winner had a higher rating than the loser whilst "Unexpected results" were those matches where the winner had a lower rating than the loser.

Wins against unrated players gave no points to the winner.

When a rated player lost against an unrated player, 10 points were deducted from the rating of the losing player.

These calculations were carried out only on the basis of the rating points, without taking into account "Bonus Points" (see below).


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Not all matches were equal

Because some table tennis events are more important than others, the rating points on offer were also different. This was known as "weighting".

The ITTF's Competition Department classified events into three different tiers, and rating points were increased for the major events.

So, for events such as the Olympic Games, World Championships and World Cup, players received double rating points, whilst for events such as the ITTF World Tour players received points multiplied by a factor of 1.5.

Third tier events, such as the Commonwealth Games and Pan-Am Games, received normal rating points.


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Bonus Points

Bonus points, like rating points, were "weighted" and awarded in four different tiers based on the event being played.

Bonus points were generally awarded on the basis of the final positions in knockout singles events.

However, in competitions where the knockout format was not used, up to 16 players could be given bonus points.

Additionally, bonus points were awarded wherever possible for third place and for other matches where intermediate positions were played for.

These bonus points remained valid for a period of 12 months from the date of each bonus point earned.

Bonus points were not awarded for Team events, Qualifying events or Ranking (Consolation) events.


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Inactive players

Players who had no recorded international results for 4 months or more were not included on the world ranking lists but retained their rating points for seeding purposes.

Players who had no recorded international results for 8 months or more were excluded from the world ranking lists. However they retained their rating points until they become active again, meaning that in the interim, these points could still be used for seeding purposes at non ITTF events only.


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New players

Under the pre-2018 system, players entered the table tennis world ranking list as soon as they had at least two wins against players already ranked.

Players were given Starting Points and these starting points were re-calculated each time a new World Ranking was produced, up to the moment a player reached or passed the limit of five wins and five losses against already ranked players.

Then these "Starting Points" become final.

But under the new system, every player who has earned ITTF Ranking points in an eligible tournament during the ranking period is included in the ITTF World Rankings.


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When are table tennis world ranking lists issued?

The ITTF was founded in 1926, and in 1928 they published the first World Ranking list for men and for women.

For many years these rankings were only issued once a year, sometimes twice ... but in 1991, with the assistance of computers, this frequency gradually increased.

Now they're produced on a monthly basis and are generally issued within the first six days of the month.


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Who dominates the world ranking lists?

Well, as you might expect, the Asian players, particularly the Chinese table tennis players, have dominated the table tennis world rankings for many years.

However, the new system has shaken up the rankings, and players such as Dimitrij Ovtcharov and Timo Boll from Germany are now riding high, along with Egypt's Omar Assar and Brazil's Hugo Calderano in the top twenty.

Three of the best men in the World Ranking List - All Chinese!

Table Tennis World Rankings - Top Chinese men by courtesy of the ITTF


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Latest table tennis world rankings

Please check this page each month for an update.

MEN (December 2019)
Ranking Player (Family Name, Given Name) Association
1 XU, Xin China
2 FAN, Zhendong China
3 MA, Long China
4 LIN, Gaoyuan China
5 HARIMOTO, Tomokazu Japan
6 CALDERANO, Hugo Brazil
7 LIN, Yun-Ju Chinese Taipei
8 LIANG, Jingkun China
9 FALCK, Mattias Sweden
10 BOLL, Timo Germany
11 OVTCHAROV, Dimitrij Germany
12 NIWA, Koki Japan
13 JANG, Woojin South Korea
14 MIZUTANI, Jun Japan
15 FRANZISKA, Patrick Germany
16 WANG, Chuqin China
17 LEE, Sangsu South Korea
18 JEOUNG, Youngsik South Korea
19 WONG, Chun Ting Hong Kong China
20 ARUNA, Quadri Nigeria
more...

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WOMEN (December 2019)
Ranking Player (Family Name, Given Name) Association
1 CHEN, Meng China
2 SUN, Yingsha China
3 LIU, Shiwen China
4 ITO, Mima Japan
5 ZHU, Yuling China
6 WANG, Manyu China
7 DING, Ning China
8 CHENG, I-Ching Chinese Taipei
9 FENG, Tianwei Singapore
10 ISHIKAWA, Kasumi Japan
11 HIRANO, Miu Japan
12 CHEN, Xingtong China
13 HE, Zhuojia China
14 POLCANOVA, Sofia Austria
15 DOO, Hoi Kem Hong Kong China
16 JEON, Jihee South Korea
17 SATO, Hitomi Japan
18 WANG, Yidi China
19 SUH, Hyowon South Korea
20 SZOCS, Bernadette Romania
more...

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To see the top 100 players on the latest table tennis world ranking lists, you can download the attached files below.

Please check this page each month for an update.

 

pdf logoThese are pdf files.

Please note:

You'll need Adobe Acrobat Reader or Preview installed on your computer to view these world ranking lists.

Most Windows computers have Adobe Acrobat Reader installed already - it's FREE, but if you're one of the few who don't already have it installed, click on this link https://get.adobe.com/reader and follow the instructions on the Adobe web site to download it.

(Mac users can use Preview which is pre-installed on all Macs)

 

TABLE TENNIS WORLD RANKING LISTS (Top 100 players)
December 2019 - Men (opens in a new window)

December 2019 - Women (opens in a new window)

November 2019 - Men (opens in a new window)

November 2019 - Women (opens in a new window)

October 2019 - Men (opens in a new window)

October 2019 - Women (opens in a new window)

September 2019 - Men (opens in a new window)

September 2019 - Women (opens in a new window)

August 2019 - Men (opens in a new window)

August 2019 - Women (opens in a new window)

July 2019 - Men (opens in a new window)

July 2019 - Women (opens in a new window)

June 2019 - Men (opens in a new window)

June 2019 - Women (opens in a new window)

May 2019 - Men (opens in a new window)

May 2019 - Women (opens in a new window)

April 2019 - Men (opens in a new window)

April 2019 - Women (opens in a new window)

March 2019 - Men (opens in a new window)

March 2019 - Women (opens in a new window)

February 2019 - Men (opens in a new window)

February 2019 - Women (opens in a new window)

January 2019 - Men (opens in a new window)

January 2019 - Women (opens in a new window)


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MORE PAGES ABOUT
MAJOR TABLE TENNIS TOURNAMENTS
For more information about the major table tennis tournaments, take a look at my other articles...

Olympic Games

Click here to show/hide all pages about the Olympic Games

2004 Olympic Games - Athens, Greece

2008 Olympic Games - Beijing, China

2012 Olympic Games - London, England

2016 Olympic Games - Rio de Janeiro, Brazil

2020 Olympic Games - Tokyo, Japan

 

World Championships

Click here to show/hide all pages about the World Championships

2009 World Championships - Yokohama, Japan

2010 World Team Championships - Moscow, Russia

2011 World Championships - Rotterdam, Netherlands

2012 World Team Championships - Dortmund, Germany

2013 World Championships - Paris, France

2014 World Team Championships - Tokyo, Japan

2015 World Championships - Suzhou, China

2016 World Team Championships - Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia

2017 World Championships - Dusseldorf, Germany

2018 World Team Championships - Halmstad, Sweden

2019 World Championships - Budapest, Hungary

 

ITTF World Tour

Click here to show/hide all pages about the ITTF World Tour

 

World Cup

Click here to show/hide all pages about the World Cup

 

European Championships

Click here to show/hide all pages about the European Championships

2008 European Championships - St Petersburg, Russia

2009 European Championships - Stuttgart, Germany

2010 European Championships - Ostrava, Czech Republic

2011 European Championships - Gdansk/Sopot, Poland

2012 European Championships - Herning, Denmark

2013 European Championships - Schwechat, Austria

2014 European Championships - Lisbon, Portugal

2015 European Championships - Russia, Ekaterinburg

2016 European Championships - Budapest, Hungary

2017 European Championships - Luxembourg, Luxembourg

2018 European Championships - Alicante, Spain

2019 European Championships - Nantes, France

 

Commonwealth Games

Click here to show/hide all pages about the Commonwealth Games

 

Table Tennis Events Calendars

Click here to show/hide all pages about Table Tennis Events Calendars

 

Table Tennis Officials

World Rankings


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